Fish Table

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Around a year ago I made a coffee table top that just never seemed to form legs. My wood skills at that point in time weren’t quite up to motivating myself for such as task, thus they, and my plank, sat on my architecture studio desk for an entire semester, then my home basement, and even survived a move. Somewhere in this hardwoods’ journey from central Virginia to Southern Maine, it lost its orthogonal form. The bandsaw turned a rectangle into a stubby walnut fish shape plank too out of touch with scale to create anything useful. It was a beautiful accident.

 

43378879915_d4eb0c1428_o.jpgThis summer I created a rectangular base with tapered maple legs, walnut crossing points, and a mahogany skirt. Some parts I shaped at Chewonki. Holding the final iteration in my basement, looking for a top,I remembered the fish. They fit together perfectly.

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Maple Table

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This build was an interesting one. Perhaps more interesting than the curvilinear contours, and undulating edge, was procuring the materials. Multiple types of maple from multiple places seemed to be this projects theme. I salvaged the crisp white top planks from a cabinetry waste bin near to the UVa Architecture School. The next pieces, two hyperbolic triangles (or something like that) came from Huston & Co scrap bins in Kennebunk. The owner of that shop and the man who handed me this wood, was the previous owner of my childhood home. He also worked as the main carpenter of the kitchen cabinets. In respect to the Huston’s, they had to be incorporated. The legs were salvaged from Portsmouth, near to where I worked in my first architecture firm as an intern, last winter. Oddly enough, they trusted me to build them cabinets for their office… Well, uh, It stood.

Happy mothers day, Mom.

Handmade Cruiser

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You give up a lot when you search for surf in colder climates. Including anything pertaining to the warm and comfortable. Search the globe and one might not find winter waves more convenient and also lonely than in southern Maine. Vactionland’s “off-season” has a lot to offer, of course the trade off is that surfing Maine can be a rather cold and unpleasant experience. “It’s too damn cold!” Some will say. “Don’t you have to wear a dry suit?” Others will ask.

During the summer months, grey skies, tall pine trees and rocky point breaks are taken over by teslas, beach moms, and increased traffic. Around this time, I bring out my own summer wheels. I made it from an eclectic mix of hardwood stringers all salvaged from scrap bins. I once passed a tesla with it, I swear.

Pictures from Kennebunk Beach

29″ x 8″ x 5/8″

Walnut, Oak, Maple

 

 

 

Tree to Table

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Once destined for dining, this table now resides as my desk. It was handcrafted using free walnut and oak off cuts that I salvaged myself. It’s true, I claimed all this wood for the cost of driving 3.2 miles and loading it in the bed of my Cherokee. In other words it was a free table top, lest I add the dozens of hours joining, planing, sanding, re-sanding, and coating towards the final tally. It was a labor of love, what else can I say.

Where did I find beautiful hardwoods for free? Gaston & Wyatt Cabinetry in Charlottesville, Virginia. Thank you for offering free hardwoods to architecture students and filling my fall semester with all the walnut I could ask for.

For those that care:

40″ x 26″ x 1 1/2″  Standing Height 37″ 
Pattern (Left to center): Black Walnut, Red Oak, White Oak, Red Oak (Quartersawn)      

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Legs purchased from Etsy.com